Four Worlds Therapy

My approach to psychological work integrates the four key dimensions: physical, emotional, mental and spiritual. Healing and transformation occurs as we become increasingly mindful of our experience in each of these levels:

  • The Physical World: Somatic psychotherapy approaches draw on the wisdom of the body, listening to its symptoms as we would to dream metaphors, and exploring memories that may be held deeply in the soma;
  • The Emotional World: through contacting and expressing our true feelings, we learn to become more comfortable with and attuned to our emotional intelligence;
  • The World of Thoughts and Beliefs: we explore the beliefs that may limit our growth, and mindfulness approaches support our becoming compassioinate witnesses to our own experience — engaging our minds to develop more positive and helpful approaches;
  • The World of the Soul: we listen to the voice of the soul through Jungian approaches such as dreamwork, shamanic journeying, active imagination, and messages received from spirit, nature, and life’s synchronicities. Ecopsychology is an approach that sees nature as a resource in our personal healing.

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Four Worlds

Four Worlds is a conceptualization of reality drawn from Jewish mystical cosmology, or kabbalah. In this model, reality is comprised of infinite worlds. Scientifically, we might think of the waves and particles that are the building blocks of creation. We, as humans, have within us worlds within worlds, which we can access through our awareness to our thoughts, feelings, sensations, and dreams and visions.

In kabbalistic and some Native American worldviews, infinite reality is conceptualized as four worlds: the physical, the emotional, the mental and the spiritual. Carl Jung noted that the number four corresponded to wholeness and is significant in many cultures throughout the world: four directions in Native American spirituality, four elements in alchemy. This conceptualization is similar to the body-mind-spirit approach recognized by eastern traditions such as yoga and Buddhism.

 

Carolyn Shoshana Fershtman, JD, PhD

Clinical Psychologist, PSY 22774

621 Cherry Street, Suite 2

Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, CA, 95404

(707) 528-2441

Contact me with questions or to schedule a consultation